Tag Archives: laxative

Knowing When to Use Goldenseal

Goldenseal is probably one of the best-known herbs, but its fame has contributed to overharvesting, and it is now considered to be an at risk plant. Therefore, it is important to know what conditions goldenseal works best for and when to choose another herb. For instance, one of goldenseal’s active components, berberine, is responsible for much of its immune stimulating and antimicrobial benefits. Oregon grape root is also rich in berberine and can be used as a more ecologically sustainable substitute for many conditions such as colds. Oregon grape root also shares many of goldenseal’s gastrointestinal benefits. Both of these herbs increase the production and flow of bile from the liver and gall bladder, making them useful for improving the digestion of fats. Oregon grape root and goldenseal also can act as a mild laxative. It could be these combined properties that earned goldenseal a reputation for being a great detoxifier, but I consider this to be mostly myth.

Where goldenseal really stands out compared to other herbs is as a mucous membrane toner. Its astringent qualities make it a good choice for chronically irritated sinuses, especially if the tissues are pale. In addition to taking it internally for issues like these, goldenseal can be added to a neti pot for direct nasal irrigation. Goldenseal can also be useful for sore throats and middle ear infections, especially chronic cases. When you do choose to use goldenseal, it is important to always buy organically grown goldenseal. This is one of the few ways to ensure that native populations aren’t being further diminished.

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Black Walnut: Powerful Herbal Warrior

On our farm on the western edge of the Ozarks, we have several magnificent black walnut trees. This is one of the native Arkansas plants I missed when in lived in Washington State. I came home to visit one fall around this time and actually carried a few of the freshly fallen nuts home with me on the plane. Other people may curse the black walnut trees in their yards because other plants have a particularly hard time growing in their shade. Black walnut trees practice chemical warfare by producing substances that inhibit the growth of many other plants so they can maintain their dominance. This attribute of black walnut gives us insight into the role this tree can play in our health.

Just as the black walnut trees fight off other plants, the black walnut hulls are used to help reduce the growth of pathogenic organisms, especially in the gastrointestinal tract. While black walnut hulls may be best known as part of an “anti-parasitic” formula, it may actually be better as an antifungal agent. It can also be applied topically to the skin. Black walnut hulls can have a fairly strong laxative effect on the gut, and in larger doses, can induce vomiting.

The green outer hull of the nut is the part of the black walnut that is used by most herbalists. The green hulls can either be used fresh or made into a tincture. If you want to work with the hulls yourself, consider using gloves because they can stain your hands. It is also worth going through the effort of cracking the very tough shell to get to the nuts. These have a very distinct flavor, but can be used like any other nut. When it comes to using the hulls, be cautious. This is a very strong herb that should only be used short term or under the supervision of a medical profession.