Tag Archives: rashes

You Can Heal Nearly Anything with Plantain

No, not this plantain.

plantains

I am talking about this common weed that grows in nearly every yard and roadside in the United States.

plantain

Plantain weed is a first aid miracle that is usually close at hand for summertime boo-boos. And if you want it even handier, local midwife Maria Chowdhury uses it as a key ingredient in her Birth Song Botanicals Healing Salve, where she combines it with other great skin healing herbs like comfrey, calendula, pau de arco, and Oregon grape root. She made it as a nipple salve for nursing mothers or a diaper rash ointment for uncomfortable babies, but it is has such versatile herbs it can be used for nearly any skin complaint.

Plantain is a common choice for insect bites and cuts and scrapes. It is well known for its ability to soothe itchy and irritated skin through its high mucilage content, which moistens and protects inflamed tissues. Plantain can also reduce inflammation and calm itchy rashes such contact dermatitis and hives. Plantain speeds the healing of skin as well as having antimicrobial properties, making it a very useful herb for cuts and minor wounds.

Internally, plantain can be used as a soothing herb in similar ways. It is helpful for inflamed and sore mucous membranes such as sore throats and irritated stomachs. Its other internal uses range from coughs to constipation, hence my statement that this handy herb can heal nearly anything.

The dried herb is not commonly available because a lot of these medicinal benefits are lost when it is dried. In the summertime, it can be used straight from the yard. A common application is a spit poultice where a few leaves are chewed up and then put directly on a bug bite or sting. In the wintertime when plantain is not so plentiful, reach for Birth Song Botanicals Healing Salve.

Birthsong

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Refreshing and Soothing Chickweed

Nothing says spring as much as baby chicks hatching on the farm. Every year, I think they are even cuter than last year’s chicks. In addition to the organic chick feed at Ozark Natural Feeds, I make sure my chicks get some fresh foods too. I find worms and wild plants for them to eat. They are happy with clumps of grass and wild clover, but they particularly love chickweed.

Gabbie and her brood enjoying chickweed

Gabbie and her brood enjoying chickweed

Chickweed is a common herb to find in your yard or garden at this time of the year. Look around for it because you might love it as much as my chickens do. Chickweed has a taste that might remind you of spinach, and it is a great addition to salads. Chickweed is highly nutritious and is considered to be a rejuvenating spring tonic.

Chickweed

Chickweed

In addition to being a great addition to the diet, chickweed is a medicinal herb that is used for soothing skin and mucous membranes such as the respiratory, digestive and urinary tracts. A chickweed tea can be used for coughs and hoarseness. It is also a mild diuretic that might be useful for urinary irritation. Chickweed is most famous for it topical uses since it can speed wound healing, reduce itching, and cool inflamed skin. It is used for everything from burns and cuts to eczema and hemorrhoids.

You can use the fresh plant to make a poultice by simply crushing the leaves and stalks and applying them directly to the skin. Ideally, cover this herbal concoction with a clean cloth to hold it in place. If using dried chickweed, grind it until it is nearly a powder then add enough hot water to make a paste. You can also make a healing chickweed salve for use all year long. Just in a Pinch Recipes has two recipes for chickweed salve. Their Itchy Salve recipe looks great.