Tag Archives: fiber

An Apple A Day

It is apple season, and my apple tree gifted me with a nearly perfect ripe apple. It was delicious, and I was equally grateful for the health benefits it provides, beyond just the vitamins and minerals that most people think about. I use apples (as well as other fruit) as a method of detoxification!

apple

I intentionally make a point to eat fruit any time I eat fish. While fish is still a healthy food that I eat occasionally as part of a diverse diet, I am concerned about the levels of mercury and other heavy metals that are present in our waters and our seafood. Did you know that seafood is the number one source of toxic mercury exposure for most Americans? While I avoid the most contaminated species of fish, I also eat an apple or other piece of fruit any time I have seafood.

Why fruit after seafood? I started this habit after reading about a study in the Amazon among women who regularly consumed fish . They found that the women who ate more fruit accumulated less mercury in their bodies compared to those who didn’t eat much fruit. Although they were eating tropical fruits, the researchers thought that it might be the fibers in the fruit that bond the mercury so less of it was absorbed, rather than any specific fruit.

I decided there was no reason not to apply this idea using our local fruits. I tend to favor apples because they are high in the fibers that may help bind toxins. The peel of apples is also full of antioxidant nutrients that can help protect the body in other ways.

It is unfortunate that our world is now so polluted that we need to consider these types of daily detoxification and protection activities. These toxic metals are particularly troublesome for one of our most valuable resources: our minds. Mercury might have negative consequences for our memory, attention span, and even moods.

This simple life hack provides another safe way to live a detoxification lifestyle and stay in balance in our modern world.

Dr. Laurell is the resident homeopathic advisor for Grato Holding, Inc.

Gluten Free Coconut Flour Pancakes for the Holidays

I find this time of year to be a great one for experimenting with food. I am not as busy with farm chores, and the cooler weather makes me want to stay warm in the kitchen.

Recently, I have been experimenting more with gluten free baking. Nothing fancy. I have just been wanting a little diversity in what I am eating while still keeping it healthy and delicious.

This last part can be a challenge because many gluten free items are lower in fiber than the whole grain versions I would have normally chosen. So, I started experimenting with coconut flour because it is high in fiber and healthy fats. Coconut also has some antiviral benefits that may help us stay healthy during the holidays. But the pancakes I made with just coconut flour were too coconut for me. It was nearly like I was eating a macaroon. Don’t get me wrong. I love macaroons, but that coconut flavor and texture wasn’t what I wanted in a pancake.

This is my less strict version of coconut flour pancakes where I added other grains and flours to find a balance between health and taste. I find them to be so tasty that I eat them with just butter and no syrup. This cuts out additional pointless sugar in my diet.

coconut flour pancakes

Coconut Flour Pancakes
3 eggs
¼ cup yogurt
¾ cup milk (or can drop the yogurt and use 1 cup of milk)
1 tablespoon honey

¼ cup coconut flour
¼ cup flaxmeal (aka ground flax seeds)
¼ cup cornmeal

½ cup gluten free flour (I used a mixture of arrowroot and potato starch)
2 tsp baking powder
¼ tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt

Butter or coconut oil for cooking

Beat eggs until frothy. Combine yogurt and all but ¼ cup of the milk. Stir in honey, coconut flour, flaxmeal, and cornmeal to soak while the mix up the remain ingredients.

In a medium size, mix the remaining dry ingredients. Mix wet ingredients into dry ingredients. Add remaining milk if mixture is too thick.

Preheat griddle or pan and grease with butter or coconut oil. Ladle 1-2 tablespoons onto hot pan for each pancake. Cook for a few minutes on each side until browned.

Probiotics for Weight Loss

Every year I find myself wanting to write another blog about probiotics, but you can’t blame me. There is a huge amount of research going on right now about the microbiome, a term referring to the complex community of abundant microorganisms that live in and on our bodies. Several recent studies are showing connections between these beneficial bacteria and maintaining a healthy body weight.

One study demonstrated a possible link between antibiotic use in children and a tendency toward weight gain. The study showed that especially boys tended to gain excess weight if given antibiotics in the first year of life. The authors suggested that doctors be more selective about giving antibiotics to infants and toddlers. Many parents push the doctors for antibiotics even for viral infection like colds that will not be helped by the antibiotics. Other times it is appropriate or even critical for antibiotics to be used. For these instances, it would be appropriate to take probiotics afterward even though studies have not been done yet to show if can help prevent weight gain after antibiotic use.

Previous studies have shown that obese people tend to have less diversity of bacteria living it the gut. To explore whether this was a cause of obesity or the effect of it, another research team gave mice the bacteria from sets of twins where one was obese and the other was lean. The mice that got the bacteria from the obese people gained weight, while mice that received bacteria from the lean people didn’t. The mice that gained weight didn’t eat more than their leaner companions. Later, those obese mice were given the bacteria from the lean people and lost weight. This benefit only occurred when the mice were also given a low-fat, high fiber diet. Without the fiber and other nutrients, the bacteria that support healthy weight seem to not flourish.

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Lactobacillus gasseri is one probiotic that is of particular interest for weight loss. A 2013 study had 210 overweight participants consume fermented milk that either contained no Lactobacillus gasseri, a moderate amount of Lactobacillus gasseri, or a large amount of it. After 12 weeks, both groups getting the Lactobacillus gasseri lost belly fat while the control group saw no change. Lactobacillus gasseri is available in probiotic capsules such as Kyo-Dophilus.

There are numerous health benefits from having a healthy population of bacteria living in our digestive tracts and helping us to maintain healthy weight is just one of them. Likewise, taking probiotics is just one component of maintaining healthy weight. Eating high fiber and nutrient rich foods helps the good bacteria thrives and provides our bodies with balanced nutrition to help us thrive too.

Granny’s Pickled Okra Recipe

This unusual cool spell has made me start thinking it is already fall. Like women and grannies of the past, I spend considerable effort in the summer and fall getting ready for winter. While my husband gathers firewood for us, my job is to preserve the summer’s harvest so we have an abundance of our own food through out the winter.

I particularly love making pickles. I give them as gifts as well as enjoy different pickled vegetables throughout the winter. When it comes to okra, this is a great way to preserve it without adding a bunch of calories like frying okra does. Okra is a good source of several vitamins and minerals as well as fiber, which is important for colon health and blood sugar. Finally, there are other health benefits from that okra mucilage, which is responsible for its slimy texture. This mucilage can soothe the gut and help absorb toxins in the digestive tract. It may even promote healthy cholesterol levels.

My friends tell me I make the best-pickled okra. I use the red okra we grow on our farm and sell at Ozark Natural Foods. It gives it a pretty pink tint.

Pickled okra

This recipe is one I got from husband’s granny who got it from her mom. I am proud to continue this Arkansas tradition by making it for my friends.

Granny’s Pickled Okra

20 ounces of small okra

2 pods hot red or green pepper

2 cloves garlic peeled

2 cups vinegar

¼ cup water

3 Tablespoons salt

¼ tsp celery seed or mustard seed (optional)

Pack okra into 2 hot sterilized pint jars. Put 1 pepper pod and 1 garlic clove in each jar. Bring remaining ingredients to a boil and pour over the okra leaving a ½ inch head room.

Process for 10 minutes in a hot water bath following professional instructions like these from Ball. http://www.freshpreserving.com/tools/waterbath-canning

Let stand for 4 weeks before using.

 

I have to admit I usually quadruple the recipe and use this ratio of water and vinegar for the brine:

1 scant cup salt

2 quarts apple cider vinegar

1 quart water

1-2 tsp celery or mustard seeds (or combination of both)

I sometimes additionally put in 1 tsp of dill seeds to the brine and/or 2 whole black peppercorns per jar. I also bring the brine to a boil while I am sterilizing the jars, but I wanted to give you granny’s original recipe the way she wrote it.

Here is an interesting recipe for bread and butter okra pickles I’ll have to try next.

And finally, here are some pictures of my husband from today doing his winter preparations. One of our shade trees died of Dutch elm disease, but at least we know where our firewood is coming from this year.

Tree cutting

Tree down

Winter is coming!

Detoxification for the New Year and Beyond

Many people like to start out their new year by following a body detoxification program. This can be a prudent time do a body cleanse since we often have reduced elimination of toxins in the winter. There are 5 organs that remove toxins from the body: the bowels, kidneys, liver, lungs, and skin. We can get rid of a wide range of toxins through our skin by sweating, but in the winter we don’t tend to sweat as much so we may hold on to more toxins. There are still options for us to sweat during the winter: exercise, saunas, or hot baths. Combine one or more of these sweating options with nearly any detoxification plan you follow, and make sure to continue it throughout the year. The unfortunate truth is that the levels of toxins around us are so great that to some extent we have to live a detoxifying life and not just rely on periodic cleanses.

Fiber is another important aspect of any cleanse that can also be a yearlong focus. Fiber is found in beans, lentils, fruits, veggies, and whole grains. There are also many supplemental options including psyllium powder, oat bran, acacia powder, apple pectin, or ground flax seeds. Fiber is a great detoxifier as it binds fats, chemicals, metals, and other desirables in the intestines. This helps reduce the intake of new toxins, and it also binds toxins released into the intestines by the liver after neutralization. In a study on Amazonian people who ate a lot of fish, the people who had the most fiber in their diet had markedly lower rates of mercury accumulation in the body compared to the low fiber group. The fiber in their diet was thought to bind most of the mercury from the fish so it couldn’t be absorbed.

To learn more about detoxification strategies, come to my lecture this Saturday January 7th at noon in the Ozark Natural Foods deli seating area.