Tag Archives: kidney health

Nettles for Allergy Season

Like nearly everyone else in Northwest Arkansas, I suffer from seasonal allergies. Fortunately mine are pretty mild. I might wake up with a sore throat or find myself sneezing while working in the garden.

nettles

My first choice herb for seasonal allergies is nettle leaf, also know as stinging nettles. Nettles can reduce the amount of histamine our bodies release in response to whatever pollen or mold is bothering us. Nettles have also traditionally been used for their ability to reduce inflammation, which may help with allergic symptoms or other conditions like arthritis.

Nettles are also a nourishing diuretic meaning they increase urination without depleting nutrients. This is because nettles are rich in vitamins and minerals to replace any that might be lost with increased urinary output. These urinary benefits makes nettle leaf a good choice for preventing urinary tract infections and kidney stones. It should be noted that nettle root could be helpful for many prostate issues since it inhibits the conversion of testosterone to estrogen.

Because they are so nutritious, nettles can be cooked like other greens. Pick the top few tender leaves, wearing gloves to avoid the sting. When nettles are cooked, the sting is neutralized.

Clearly, it is safe to use large quantities of nettles for allergy season support since they can be eaten as a food. If nettles alone aren’t enough, I add quercetin and N-acetyl cysteine to further diminish allergy symptoms. Quercetin shares nettles antihistamine characteristics while N-acetyl cysteine helps break up mucus.

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Calcium Controversy

There have been a few studies in recent years that have gotten a lot of press for supposedly showing that certain common supplements are harming people’s health. While it is indeed possible that we can take too much of a good thing and cause a health problem, most of these studies have been flawed or revealed flaws in how we use supplements. For instance, some studies on calcium have shown it to be correlated with increased rates of heart disease. This makes some sense because in some forms arteriosclerosis, hardening of the arteries, calcium is part of the problem. But if we are taking calcium appropriately we shouldn’t be contributing to this issue. I always make sure that people taking calcium have adequate levels of vitamin D and K. Vitamin D is necessary for adequate calcium absorption and utilization. Vitamin K places two important roles with calcium. It works to help get calcium into our bones, while also being an important component of a protein that keep calcium from being deposited in our blood vessels. Another important consideration is the calcium to magnesium ratio. If someone is taking calcium without paying attention to their magnesium intake, they might become magnesium deficient, which could contribute to heart disease. Finally, I always have my patients take their calcium with a meal because calcium taken away from meals might play a role in kidney stone formation. When calcium is taken with meals, it might help prevent a common type of kidney stones.

Nutrients work together to keep our bodies functioning properly. When we use wise combinations and appropriate doses, supplements are unlikely to harm us. Another option is to improve our calcium intake from our diet. World’s Healthiest Foods has a fabulous website that includes charts of the foods highest in certain nutrients like calcium.

kale

Ubiquinol: A better form of Coenzyme Q10

Coenzyme Q10 is an important supplement that can benefit numerous conditions, especially heart disease. CoQ10, as it is often called, supports energy production in our cells and works as an antioxidant to protect our cells from damage. These roles are important for heart health because the heart needs a lot of energy. In addition, the ability of CoQ10 to prevent the oxidation of cholesterol may help protect us from atherosclerosis. CoQ10 is also used to reduce fatigue in patients with fibromyalgia. It can help protect the kidneys and liver. One month of CoQ10 supplementation was even shown to reduce symptoms of dry mouth, probably by improving the functioning of the salivary glands. CoQ10 is even thought to reduce some of the symptoms of old age. In a study with middle-aged mice, those who had received regular CoQ10 showed reduced signs of aging and improved activity levels.

So where does ubiquinol fit into this picture? There are actually two forms of CoQ10, known as ubiquinone and ubiquinol. Most CoQ10 is ubiquinone, the oxidized form of the molecule, while ubiquinol is the reduced form. This means that ubiquinol is the form of CoQ10 that is ready to neutralize antioxidants. Even more important is that ubiquinol can be up to 3 times more absorbable than the standard ubiquinone form. This varies because our body seem to change how much it absorbs based on how much CoQ10 we need. For instance, people with congestive heart failure usually need more CoQ10. In a recent study among this patient group, taking an average of 450 mg of ubiquinone resulted in blood levels of CoQ10 around 1.6 micrograms per milliliter, but when they switched to an average of 580 mg of ubiquinol, their blood levels jumped to 6.5 micrograms per milliliter. Even more importantly, the switch to ubiquinol resulted in improvements in their symptoms. So even though ubiquinol is more expensive than the standard forms of CoQ10, you can get more for your money by buying this more absorbable form.