Tag Archives: minerals

Stay Hydrated and Enjoy Water

Warmer days are here so it is an important time to make sure we are drinking enough water. It is extremely important that we stay hydrated all year round. Adequate water helps flush toxins out of our body and keeps our skin and joints healthy. During the summer, dehydration can contribute to heat exhaustion and other serious issues.

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Getting adequate electrolytes can be just as important as drinking water. Electrolytes are the minerals that our bodies need for proper nerve and muscle function. My husband works a lot outside, and in the past, he would start feeling nauseous on very hot days. Now he adds ElectroMix, an electrolyte blend without sugar, to his water and hasn’t had a problem since.

I started using the ElectroMix too on the days I work in the garden and find it feels more refreshing than regular water. I have found this to be true with some other enhanced waters too. I don’t drink very much coconut water because I don’t want to add the extra sugar to my diet, but I do feel better hydrated when I drink it.

Electrolytes and minerals are what these two beverages have in common. So I started experimenting with other minerals in my water. I found I like adding ¼ of a serving of Pure Essence’s Magnesium Plus powder to my water in the evening. This diluted mixture is still flavorful enough and sweet from stevia, lo han fruit, and FOS, a prebiotic. I don’t know if it is the sweet flavor or the extra minerals and nutrients, but this drink is reducing my evening sugar cravings.

Don’t get me wrong. I love plain water and drink lots of it, always purified. Sometimes I just want something else. A sparkling mineral water might help satisfy the desire for a soda. I just tried a new blackberry pomegranate flavored one from Mountain Valley out of Hot Springs, Arkansas. Other great ideas are iced herbal teas, adding lemon to your water or even trying a diluted version of my 2 Minute Detox Drink .

So stay hydrated, and tell me which other healthy beverages your body says YES to.

Potassium Powerhouse Foods for Stroke Prevention and More

I frequently recommend foods high in potassium to my patients with high blood pressure. A recent study has me thinking I need to recommend these foods to more patients. This new study revealed that postmenopausal women who consumed the most potassium reduced their chance of stroke by 12% compared to those who ate the least. Women who didn’t have high blood pressure noticed an even better outcome from eating more potassium with a 27% reduction in strokes. Potassium is thought to improve the functioning of small blood vessels in the brain and throughout the body, partially by improving nitric oxide formation which can help open up blood vessels.

Rainbow Chard

Rainbow Chard

In truth, I recommend high potassium diets to most of my patients by encouraging them to eat a lot of vegetables. I believe that one of the reasons we need to get our 5-7 servings of veggies and fruit every day is to make sure we get adequate potassium. The average adult needs about 4700 mg of potassium a day. Many of the best potassium-rich foods are vegetables. For instance, a cup of cooked Swiss chard offers around 900 mg of potassium. Other high potassium foods include spinach, bok choy, beets, nuts, and dried beans. For a great list of potassium-rich foods, I like the chart available from World’s Healthiest Foods. My husband and I additionally take an electrolyte mixture that includes potassium when we work on the farm during these hot summers. Another good choice might be coconut water to help replace some of the potassium lost through sweating.

By emphasizing potassium intake, we get all of the benefits offered by this crucial mineral. Potassium is essential for nerve function throughout the body and especially in the heart. Getting adequate potassium can help preserve bone density and prevent the formation of kidney stones. Potassium deficiency might contribute to premenstrual issues and possibly the development of diabetes. As I mentioned above, eating high potassium foods can be one of the steps to help people reach a healthy blood pressure goal. And when we eat high potassium foods, we also get the full range of powerhouse nutrients that these foods provide. It is likely that these additional minerals, vitamins, and antioxidants from fruits and veggies contribute to some of the cardiovascular protection seen in these studies.

So figure out what high potassium foods you love to eat, and if you want some tips on getting more vegetables in your family’s life, check out my blog on getting kids to eat veggies.

Dandelion: Don’t overlook this friend in your yard

Fall is the time to start harvesting roots. Just like we will soon be digging our sweet potatoes out of the ground, it is also time to harvest the medicinal roots. As plants go dormant for the year, they store nutrients in their roots, making medicinal roots more potent in the fall. As far as the medicinal constituents are concerned, roots are often more potent than leaves, but depending on the plant, roots can have some different medicinal uses than the leaves. Dandelion is an example of this that is likely growing in your own yard. Many people use the leaves and roots interchangeably, but there are qualities that are unique to both forms.

Dandelion has earned a reputation for being a liver and gall bladder supporting herb. The leaves increase the production of bile by the liver. The roots help to move the bile out of the gall bladder, and then along with the bile, toxins that can be eliminated from the body through the feces. Therefore, the use of the roots and leaves together is important for the best liver benefits. Because it supports the liver, dandelion is traditionally used to help high cholesterol, abnormal blood sugar, menstrual and skin disorders, especially when there is a history of toxic exposures or sluggish liver.

Dandelion leaves have a much stronger diuretic action than the roots. Because of dandelion leaves’ diuretic action, they are used for conditions like edema, rheumatic complaints, and sometimes high blood pressure. Because the leaves are high in potassium, they replace any potassium that might be lost with increased urine flow. They also contain many other trace minerals and can be used as a food or tea by people who need to boost their mineral intake.

Dandelion also helps support digestion. The increased production and movement of bile can help improve digestion of fats. In the fall, the roots are high in inulin, a preferred food of the beneficial bacterial in the gut. Dandelion leaves also have a bitter taste, which can stimulate the digestive process. Thus, dandelion is also used for headaches associated with disordered digestion. The leaves are the most bitter in the spring, but I personally prefer to eat them straight out of my yard in the wintertime when they often stand out bright green even if most of the rest of the yard has faded.